First Female SCOTUS Justice Sandra O’Connor Confirmed by Senate in 33 Days; Justice Stevens, 19 Days

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Former Associate Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  (Getty Images)

Former Associate Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Getty Images)

(CNS News) — President Donald Trump has indicated he will nominate a female justice to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the U.S. Supreme Court this coming Saturday, Sept. 26. If that happens, there is plenty of history to show that the Senate could confirm that nominee before Election Day, Nov. 3, given that the first female affirmed to the high court, Sandra Day O’Connor, was confirmed in 33 days. 

After Saturday, Sept. 26, there are 37 calendar days until Nov. 3, and 116 days until Inauguration Day, Jan. 20, 2021. 

Former Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.  (Getty Images)

Former Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. (Getty Images)

As documented by the U.S. Senate and reported in The New York Times, not a few justices were confirmed by the Senate to the high court in less than 50 days — the duration of Ginsburg’s confirmation — and even less than 35 days.

For instance, Sandra Day O’Connor was nominated by President Ronald Reagan on Aug. 19, 1981, and she was confirmed by the Senate on Sept. 21, 1981 — a duration of 33 days. 

Former Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, who was confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 19 days.  (Getty Images)

Former Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, who was confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 19 days. (Getty Images)

Justice John Paul Stevens was nominated by President Gerald R. Ford; his confirmation took 19 days. 

Justice Harry Blackmun was nominated by President Richard Nixon, and it took 27 days to confirm him; Justice Warren Burger, 17 days to confirm; Justice Abe Fortas, 14 days; Justice Byron White, 8 days; and Justice Charles Whittaker, 17 days. 

Justice Hugo Black, nominated by FDR, took 5 days to confirm; Justice Benjamin Cardozo was confirmed in 9 days during the Hoover administration. 

Then-Supreme Court Justice Byron White poses for a portrait in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building July 1974 in Washington, DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

Then-Supreme Court Justice Byron White poses for a portrait in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building July 1974 in Washington, DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

 



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